Bibliography on FAST Academic Literature

Ackley, M. K. & Cullen, P. M. (2010). Strengthening families through community collaboration: Implementing the Families and Schools Together (FAST) program. Children & Schools, 32 (3): 183-186.

Billingham, S.C. (1993). Evaluation Research Design for the Family and Schools Together Program (FAST) [Doctoral dissertation]. Chicago (IL): DePaul University. 

Condon, M., Lavery, L. & Engle, J. P. (2015). Measuring social capital: Accounting for nested data and subnetworks within schools. Social Indicators Research, 126 (3): 1189-1207. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-015-0945-2

Crozier, M., Rokutani, L., Russett, J. L., Godwin, E., & Banks, G. E. (2010). A multisite program evaluation of Families and Schools Together (FAST): Continued evidence of a successful multifamily community-based prevention program. School Community Journal, 20(1): 187-207.

Fearnow-Kenney, M., Hill, P. & Gore, N. (2016). Child and parent voices on a community-based prevention program (FAST). School Community Journal, 26 (1): 223-238.

Fiel, J. E., Haskins, A. R. & Lopez-Turley, R. N. (2013). Reducing school mobility: A randomized trial of a relationship-building intervention. American Educational Research Journal, 50 (6): 1188-1218.

Fiel, J., Shoji, M. & Gamoran, A. (2015). An intervention approach to building social capital: Effects on grade retention. In: Y. Li (ed.), Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Social Capital (pp. 262-291). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Fischer, R. L. (2003). School-based family support: Evidence from an exploratory field study. Families in Society: Journal of Contemporary Social Services, 84 (3): 339-347. https://doi.org/10.1606/1044-3894.113

Fletcher, J., Fairlough, A., & McDonald, L. (2013). Engaging young parents and their families in a multi-family group work intervention: Lessons for a pilot in England. Practice: Social Work in Action, 25 (3): 151-167.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09503153.2013.799647

Frederico, M. & Whiteside, M. (2016). Building school, family, and community partnerships: Developing a theoretical framework. Australian Social Work, 69 (1): 51-66.

Gamoran, A., Lopez-Turley, R. N., Turner, A. & Fish, R. (2012). Differences between Hispanic and non-Hispanic families in social capital and child development: First-year findings from an experimental study. Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, 30 (1): 97-112.

Guenther, J. & Mal, G. (2014). Learning from evaluations of school-family strengthening programs: Lessons for all. Evaluation Journal of Australasia, 14 (2): 42-51.

Guerra, N. G. & Knox, L. (2008). How culture impacts the dissemination and implementation of innovation: A case study of the Families and Schools Together programme (FAST) for preventing violence with immigrant Latino youth. American Journal of Community Psychology, 41 (3-4): 304-313.

Hafford-Letchfield, T. & Thomas, B. (2018). Bridging communities through co-learning and participation in parenting programmes: A case from the Families and Schools Together project. In: A. Melling & R. Pilkington (eds.), Paulo Freire and Transformative Education: Changing Lives and Transforming Communities (pp. 141-152). London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hafford-Letchfield, T., Thomas, B. & McDonald, L. (2018). Social work students as community partners in a family intervention programme. Journal of Social Work, 18 (5): 598-617.

Hernandez, L. (2000). Families and Schools Together: Building Organizational Capacity for Family-School Partnerships. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project. Available from: https://archive.globalfrp.org/var/hfrp/storage/fckeditor/File/families_and_schools_together.pdf

Hernandez, L. P., Hernandez, A., Lopez, M. E., Kreider, H., & Coffman, J. (2000). Local and national implementation of the Families and Schools Together (FAST) program. School Community Journal, 10 (1): 85- 110.

Knox, L., Guera, N. G., Williams, K. R., & Toro, R. (2011). Preventing children’s aggression in immigrant Latino families: A mixed methods evaluation of the Families and Schools Together program. American Journal of Community Psychology, 48 (1-2): 65-76.

Kratochwill, T. R., McDonald, L., Levin, J. R., Bear-Tibbetts, H. Y., & Demaray, M. K. (2004). Families and Schools Together: An experimental analysis of a parent-mediated multi-family group programme for American Indian children. Journal of School Psychology, 42 (5): 359-383.

Kratochwill, T. R., McDonald, L., Levin, J. R., Scalia, P. A., & Coover, G. (2009). Families and Schools Together: An experimental study of multi-family support groups for children at risk. Journal of School Psychology, 47 (4): 245-265.

Layzer, J. I., Goodson, B., Creps, C., Werner, A., & Bernstein, L. (2001). National Evaluation of Family Support Programs: Volume B. Research Studies: Final Report. Abt Associates, Inc.: Cambridge, MA.

Lindsay, G. & Strand, S. (2013). Evaluation of the national roll-out parenting programmes across England: The parenting early intervention programme (PEIP). BMC Public Health, 13 (1): 972.

Lindsay, G., Cullen, S., & Wellings, C. (2011). Bringing Families and Schools Together: Giving Children in High-Poverty Areas the Best Start at School. London, UK: Save the Children. Accessed at: https://my.optimus-education.com/sites/optimus-education.com/files/session_1b_-_chris_wellings_-__handout_1.pdf

Lopez, R. N., Gamoran, A., McCarty, A. T. & Fish, R. (2017). Reducing children’s behavior problems through social capital: A causal assessment. Social Science Research, 61 (1): 206-217.

Lord, P., Styles, B., Morrison, J., White, R., Andrade, J., Bamford, S., (2018). Families and Schools Together (FAST): evaluation report and executive ssummary. https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/projects-and-evaluation/projects/families-and-schools-together-fast (accessed 12 November 2018).

Maalouf, W. & Campello, G. (2014). The influence of family skills programmes on violence indictors: Experience from a multi-site project of the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime in low and middle income countries. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 19 (6): 616-624.

McDonald, L. (2015). Families and Schools Together (FAST). In: J. J. Ponzetti (ed.), Evidence-based Parenting Education: A Global Perspective (pp. 244-264). London, UK: Routledge.

McDonald, L. & Doostgharin, T. (2012). UNODC Global Family Skills Initiative: Outcome evaluation in Central Asia of Families and Schools Together (FAST) multi-family groups. Social Work & Social Sciences Review, 16 (2): 51-75.

McDonald, L. & Sayger, T. V. (1998). Impact of a family and school based prevention programme on protective factors for high risk youth. Drugs & Society, 12 (1-2): 61-85. https://doi.org/10.1300/J023v12n01_06

McDonald, L., Billingham, S., Conrad, T., Morgan, A., O., N., & Payton, E. (1997). Families and Schools Together (FAST): Integrating community development with clinical strategies. Families in Society: Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 78 (2): 140-143. https://doi.org/10.1606/1044-3894.754

McDonald, L., Conrad, T., Fairtlough, A., Fletcher, J., Green, L., Moore, L., & Leeps, B. (2009). An evaluation of a groupwork intervention for teenage mothers and their families. Child & Family Social Work, 14 (1): 45-57.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2206.2008.00580.x

McDonald, L., Coover, G., Sandler, J., Thao, T., & Shalhoub, H. (2012). Cultural adaptation of an evidence- based parenting programme with elders from South East Asia in the US: Co-producing Families and Schools Together (FAST). Journal of Children’s Services, 7 (2): 113-128.

McDonald, L., FitzRoy, S., Fuchs, I., Fooken, I., & Klasen, H. (2012). Strategies for high retention rates of low- income families in FAST (Families and Schools Together): An evidence-based parenting programme in the USA, UK, Holland and Germany. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9 (1): 75-88.

McDonald, L., Miller, H. & Sandler, J. (2015). A social ecological, relationship-based strategy for parent involvement: Families and Schools Together (FAST). Journal of Children’s Services, 10 (3): 218-230.

McDonald, L., Moberg, D. P., Brown, R., Rodriguez-Espiricuta, I., Flores, N. I., Burke, M. P., & Coover, G. (2006). After-school multifamily groups: A randomized controlled trial involving low-income, urban, Latino children. Children & Schools, 28 (1): 25-34.

Mechielsen, J., Galbraith, M. & Andrew, W. (2014). Reclaiming indigenous youth in Australia: Families and Schools Together. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Problems: Reclaiming Children and Youth, 23 (2): 35-41.

Miller, H., Robinson, M., Valentine, J. J. & Fish, R. (2016). Is the feeling mutual? Examining parent-teacher relationships in low-income, predominantly Latino schools. American Journal of Education, 123 (1): 37-67.

Moberg, D.P., McDonald, L., Posner, J.K., Burke, M.L., Brown, R.L. (2007). Randomized trial of Families and Schools Together (FAST): final report on NIDA Grant R01‐10067. https://www.familiesandschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/FAST-RCT-Final-Report-on-NIDA-Grant.pdf

Park, S. & Kaplan, D. (2015). Bayesian casual medication analysis for group randomized designs with homogeneous and heterogeneous effects: simulation and case study. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 50 (3): 316-333.

Patrikakou, E.N., Weissberg, R.P., Redding, S., & Walberg, H.J. (2005). School‐family partnerships: enhancing the academic, social, and emotional learning of children. In: Patrikakou E, Anderson AR editor(s). School‐Family Partnerships for Children’s Success. New York: Teachers College Press.

Rangel, D. E., Shoji, M, N. & Gamoran, A. (2020). The development and sustainability of school-based parent networks in low-income Latinx communities: A mixed-methods investigation. American Educational Research Journal, 57 (6): 2450-2484.


Rangel, D. E., & Valdez, C. R. (2017). A Culturally Sensitive Approach to Large-Scale Prevention Studies: A Case Study of a Randomized Controlled Trial With Low-Income Latino Communities. The Journal of Primary Prevention38(6), 627–645. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10935-017-0487-2


Sass, J.S. (1999). Comprehensive evaluation report for the Canadian replication of the Families and Schools Together (FAST) program. Annual Meeting of the American Evaluation Association; 1999; Nov 3‐6; Orlando (FL). [ERIC: ED435689; archive.org/details/ERIC_ED435689]

Shoji, M. N., Haskins, A. R., Rangel, D. E. & Sorensen, K. N. (2014). The emergence of social capital in low-income Latino elementary schools. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 29 (4): 600-613.

Spoth, R.L., Randall, G.K., Trudeau, L., Shin, C., & Redmond, C. (2008). Substance use outcomes 5 1/2 years past baseline for partnership‐based, family‐school preventive interventionsDrug and Alcohol Dependence 2008;96(1‐2):57‐68.

Terrion, J. L. (2006). Building social capital in vulnerable families: Success markers of a school-based intervention program. Youth & Society, 38 (2): 155-176.

Terrion, J. L. & Hogrebe, A. (2007). A Canadian experience with an intervention program for vulnerable families: Lessons learned for German social work and policy. European Journal of Social Work, 10 (3): 401- 416.

Usiskin-Cohen, E. (2016). Does community CAMHS miss a trick? A FAST approach to preventative work in the community. In: T. Afuape & I. B. Krause (eds.), Urban Child and Adolescent Mental Health: A Responsive Approach to Communities (pp. 128-142). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

Vaez, H., Zargar, Y., Naami, A., Doostgharin & Honarmand, M. M. (2019). The effects of Families and Schools Together (FAST) program on behavioral problems of students. Journal of Psychological Achievements, 26 (2): 89-112.

Valdez, C.  R., Mills, M., Bohlig, A., & Kaplan, D. (2013). The role of parental language acculturation in the formation of social capital: Differential effects on high-risk children. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 44 (2): 334-350.

Valdez, C. R., Padilla, B. & Valentine, J. L. (2013). Consequences of Arizona’s immigration policy on social capital among Mexican mothers with unauthorised immigration status. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 35 (3): 303-322.

Valdez, C. R., Shewakramani, V., Goldberg, S., & Padilla, B. (2013). Parenting influences on Latino children’s social competence in the first grade: parental depression and parent involvement at home and school. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 44 (5): 646-657.

Valdez, C. R., Valentine, J. L., & Padilla, B. (2013). “Why we stay:” Immigrants’ motivations for remaining in communities impacted by anti-immigration policy. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 19 (3): 279-287.

Valentine, J.C., Leach, S.M., Fowler, A.P., Stojda, D.K. & Macdonald, G. (2019). Families and Schools Together (FAST) for improving outcomes for children and their families. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 7: # CD012760.

Warren, K., Moberg, D. P., & McDonald, L. (2006). FAST and the arms race: The interaction of group aggression and the Families and Schools Together programme in the aggressive and delinquent behaviors of inner-city elementary school students. Journal of Primary Prevention, 27 (1): 27-45.

Warren, K., Schoppelrey, S., Moberg, D. P., & McDonald, L. (2005). A model of contagion through competition in the aggressive behaviors of elementary school students. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 33 (3): 283-292.

Wattenberg E, & Pearson Y. (1996). Defining Excellence for School‐Linked Services: A Summary of Proceedings of the Conference Held September 14, 1995 at the University of Minnesota. Minneapolis (MN): Center for Urban and Regional Affairs, 1995. [ERIC: files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED398339.pdf] \

Last Updated October 2022

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